Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Nov 30 2018

FF: Not Punny

Fox 2

Seriously, I’m about to lose my temper.  Of course, as a last resort anything goes.  But are students and faculty going to have time to search for their hockey pucks when faced with an active shooter?  Or will they carry them in their hands at all times – just in case?  How is this any different from the peas and corn??

This is Annie, who moonlights as a kitten nanny, and is happy to be living where raccoons are not indigenous to the area.

This reminds me of the time my dog, Annie, was attacked in my back yard by a mama raccoon (yes, this is a true story).  My neighbor saw it happening and grabbed what was handy – a basketball.  He must have played ball in his youth, because he threw the ball over our fence and hit the raccoon with enough force for her to decide that running from this new threat made more sense than continuing to attack Annie, at which point she returned to her babies under the shed.

In the case of Annie and the raccoon, the stars were perfectly aligned (the pucks – I mean ducks – were in a row).  The neighbor was outside and heard the attack, the ball was handy and he had good aim and a strong arm, and the raccoon made the right decision.  Is this really the best we can do to protect our students and teachers from an intruder?

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11 Responses to “FF: Not Punny”

  1. Scott Raymond says:

    We need more Annie and Kittens

  2. Kevin says:

    Simply put…..OMG!!!

  3. Eric says:

    At first, I thought this was a parody article from The Onion. Sadly, it wasn’t.

  4. Robert Spicher says:

    The puck leaves me speechless, but did anyone else notice the knob on the classroom door?

  5. LarryG says:

    Reminds me of the old saying: “You can’t fix stupid.” It’s always interesting to see what kind of mind-numbing ideas those with no relevant education or experience can come up with as well as how often they never seem to appreciate/understand/comprehend any of the downside risks associated with their own idea and most especially in terms of compliance with applicable codes, standards, or regulations.

    I get that everyone wants safe education buildings and for students not to get harmed at school. What I don’t get is when education administrators don’t know how to improve building safety why most of them are not smart enough to consult with an architect or safety engineer.

  6. Adam Kuipers says:

    I was glad they at least mentioned upgrading door hardware, though it was like a second thought…

  7. Louise says:

    Just a minute, it’s in here somewhere at the bottom of my backpack which is still ON my back.
    Okay, got it.
    Now, come closer. I have terrible aim.
    Closer.
    Still closer.
    Good, now I can get you with the screwdriver that was also in my pack. (Doesn’t everyone carry at least one screwdriver?)

  8. Marshall says:

    The reason they don’t consult with a “qualified” architect or safety engineer is because it costs money to get the right answer. Yes I put qualified in quotes as many architects aren’t qualified. I’ve also notice that most administrations are happier to line their pockets instead of doing the right thing (paying teachers better and improve the safety correctly). The really sad part is, mainstream media is hyping all the “quick fixes” and inexpensive ways to solve the problems. Sooner or later all schools will be obsolete as we’ll all be watching a lecture from the comforts of our own homes and won’t have to interact with anybody.

  9. Tim Delorme says:

    I live in Maine. When a wild animal behaves this way, it could very likely be rabid. That is why I am armed whenever I walk my dog.

    • Lori says:

      Hi Tim –

      I was living in Massachusetts at the time. I did talk to animal control about the incident, but based on the babies under the shed the officer decided that Annie probably just got a little too close. The shed was in another neighbor’s yard, but the mama came over the wire fence when she saw the dog.

      I grew up in Vermont, and I still can’t believe I used to walk a mile+ home from the bus stop (starting in first grade!), without some sort of protection.

      – Lori

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