Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


May 10 2019

FF: Wheelie

I have a theory about what happened here…what’s yours?

Thank you to Mark Harberts of Dekker/Perich/Sabatini for today’s Fixed-it Friday photo!

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10 Responses to “FF: Wheelie”

  1. Yacoob Moreef says:

    It looks like that the door’s hinges and jamb support got weaken after time. The door now leaning away from the hinged side causing it to hit the floor when opens and when closed the latch does not align with the strike. To solve the out of alignment, new hardware was introduced at the bottom of the door “wheel” to help guide the door back in alignment to latch and to guide it over the door sill or the high point at the floor when closed. Whatever the reason is, they did install the wheel on pull side, so it is ADA compliance with (no protrusions in the bottom 10 inches of the door opening height).

  2. Tim says:

    Love how the trim is mounted upside down instead of rehanding

  3. Fadi ammoun says:

    Spring hinge has been added to the top.
    Mortise lock has been removed and replaced with panic bar.
    One hinge is added at the bottom.

  4. Christopher Newton says:

    There could be a problem with the hinges. Since this appears to be an oversize door and standard hinges just wouldn’t support the weight. Note that there are two surface mounted hinges that were added in addition to the existing mortised hinges. Another possibility is that the door is missing an automatic closer, and the door opened too far, too many times. With condition at the door jamb acting like a fulcrum, the fasteners on the hinges started to come loose. Also note the concrete block that could be acting as a door stop.

  5. James v Vitale says:

    Note: CMU door stop may have been introduced because closer lacks a 90 degree limit to prevent door hardware from hitting wall?

    • Lori says:

      Bingo! I think the block was added because the door does not have a stop, and the hinges were damaged because the door opened too far. The rest is history.

      – Lori

  6. Andy Turbett says:

    This looks like a pre-engineered building, many of which seem to have products/materials which barely meet Code requirements. The fault may not be with the hinges but rather with the jamb (either the door frame or what the frame is anchored against). Regardless, the wheel is useless; unless that slab is perfectly level and immune from any type of vertical movement (such as frost heave), then either the wheel will pinch-n-gap (relative to the slab) or the hinges need to be sufficiently loosly-secured to allow the door to wiggle (relative to the frame).

    Also, does it appear that the trim at the head of the door is sagging?

  7. David Federico says:

    This would have been the perfect candidate for a LCN 4041XP PA Cush or H cush . Along with a continuous strip hinge .. but hey who has money to throw away on for hardware or security products. Lol

  8. Bryan says:

    Some people should not work on doors!

  9. Rich McKie says:

    We see that quite a bit on our buildings. (The issue not “THAT” solution!)
    Exterior floor stops get broken off by vandals, H-cush closer arms get bent, and just last week I saw
    a door with an overhead stop that had been opened so violently the hinge mounts in the door were bent out.
    We have found that spring-cush arms with properly adjusted back-check really help but using a good solid bollard as a stop is the ultimate solution.
    Another pet peeve of mine is people (Teachers in our case) using wedges in the hinge edge of a door. All it takes is a kid pushing or pulling on the door and the hinges or the hinge mounts bend, making the door unserviceable.

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