Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Apr 17 2019

WW: Shark Tank

Category: Locks & Keys,Videos,Wordless WednesdayLori @ 12:16 am Comments (11)
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I thought everyone in the world of hardware had already seen this video, but last night I ran across someone who hadn’t, so here it is.  I didn’t want to post it until the full episode became available on ABC.com.

Although I’m really happy to see a residential deadbolt perform so well in the clip below, I do feel bad for Alex. But I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – traditional locksets are effective for protecting homes, classrooms, and other openings.  Most locksets comply with the requirements for egress and life safety, fire protection, and accessibility.

If your door already has a lockset, why spend money on an additional gadget that may inhibit egress or be deployed by an unauthorized person to secure a room and commit a crime?

Enjoy this Wordless Wednesday video:

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11 Responses to “WW: Shark Tank”

  1. Lach says:

    The only time I could see this being useful is in a residential setting for that one door that is not usually used that is not clearly visible from the street (more likely to be broken into if less visible). But only one that wouldn’t be used in you home’s emergency exit plan. That’s about it. Even then I can’t see it adding any real security as any burglar could still go through a window with a brick. At no point would I use this for a commercial setting.

  2. Eric says:

    Love it. Alex looked a little tired. Perhaps a similar presentation should be made demonstrating that a code compliant lock is just as effective for security without the use of non-code compliant, aftermarket barricade device?

  3. Matt says:

    One problem faced in a lot of residential settings is that your typical single-family exterior door is a light-gauge steel door filled with Styrofoam installation…in a pine frame. A good kick will send a B60 flying right through that pine frame, especially since builders typically throw away the thick strike with 3″ screws and just install the decorative strike with 3/4″ wood screws. I’m pretty sure that a good amount of kicking and battering will also lay waste to the strike and screws bundled with the B60. Thus, the sales of all these ridiculous after-market devices.

    My preference for single-family construction would be commercial steel door frames securely attached to the stud nest; you can easily trim these with wood on both sides, and you’d never know it was steel.

  4. Gordon says:

    My parents down in Texas have had the back door of their house kicked in twice. The second time with the door frame reinforced (we found the deadbolt in multiple pieces on the floor and back porch). I wonder if this would be something that could be used for them. At the same time, it seems like it would be more worth the trouble to invest in a better frame and door. Steelcraft for the win!

    Also that last kick was epic

  5. A.J. Vanhooser says:

    What happens when this malfunctions while you’re away and you can’t get through the door?

  6. Bryan says:

    Every amateur wants to attack the lock side of the door when in fact the hinge side is the weakest point. Four screws less than an inch long at each leaf of a cheap residential door. Who cares what is at the bottom or lock side of a door, sledgehammer top and middle hinge and the door pivots right around the bolt and bottom hinge. The stile gets blown right out of the door.

  7. Darrell says:

    I hadn’t seen that video.

    Nice idea. I would NEVER use that product. The first time your dog or cat walks to the door and trips the device, you’re calling the fire department or someone with a big saw to get into your house. Either way $$$.

  8. Louise says:

    And, a trip hazard.
    An unexpected lip with door open.
    Better yet, pop it up while the door is open and watch the fun ensue.
    At least it looks like you might be able to close the door if it’s already up.

  9. Eric R. says:

    The one time I had a break-in the bad guy merely broke a window and didn’t mess with the door.

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