Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Nov 15 2018

TEDx: “Stupid School Security and Discipline Policies”

Category: School Security,VideosLori @ 12:14 am Comments (5)
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Although this TEDx talk is not completely related to physical security in schools, it’s valuable to understand the bigger picture when we are working to help schools provide the necessary level of security.  I think some of the speaker’s points may be why I have been somewhat hesitant to recommend keeping classroom doors locked at all times.  It’s a reminder – multiple times each day – that “the bad guy” has to be kept out, when the risk of an intruder attempting to enter is actually quite low.  With that said, each school district needs to adopt whatever security measures work best for their community, and I’m not judging those choices.

A 12-year-old girl just moved in across the street from us, after living in an upscale area near Austin, Texas.  She told my daughter (also 12), “In my old school I had a 1 in 900 chance of being shot every day.”  WHAT?  Kids hear and absorb more than we think they do.  The heightened state of security that is evident in many schools – armed security officers, metal detectors, dozens of cameras, etc. – could have a lasting impact on our kids.  Yes, we need to keep them safe and secure, but without making schools feel like prisons.

Thank you to Joe Prosser of LaForce for sending me the link to this video!

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5 Responses to “TEDx: “Stupid School Security and Discipline Policies””

  1. jbossie@kamcolocksolutions.com says:

    Thanks for sharing Lori!! She is right on with schools becoming more and more like prisons and how its effecting the students. Love the garden!

  2. Darrell says:

    As a professional who has been in the design and construction industry of K-12 facilities for over 30 years I have to say I’m floored by that video.

    Here we have an educator blaming the architecture and administrative structure of today’s schools as the root of problem when it comes to today’s school shootings and the like.

    On the flip-side, I believe there’s a stronger argument that the past twenty plus years of “every player gets a trophy” and “there’s no wrong way to spell C-A-T” or “2+2 can equal 5” approach to rearing the children of today fails to properly introduce them to the realities of failure, rejection and the other woes of society and nature that will inevitably be thrust upon them.

  3. lseliber@keyingsolutions.com says:

    Lori, thanks for posting this video, it’s an opinion that needs to be heard. I agree with the presenter on several points, but disagree with her statements about CPED (having just completed a CPED review for a hotel that looks nothing like a prison) and with changing regulations to guidelines. For comparison, imagine if we wrote specifications or product standards by generally indicating what we wanted. That would be a disaster. There’s a place for general guidelines, and there’s a place for detailed requirements.

    If I could speak to the presenter, i would tell her about the methodology we use in manufacturing for enabling change. Its “Plan-Do-Check-Act.” Observations of what doesn’t work are a good start, but you need to create a detailed plan for something else, run a pilot and see how it works, evaluate it, and if you get a good result develop a plan to implement it throughout the organization. You need to get stakeholder buy-in at several points along the way, which requires learning what’s important to everyone involved in the process. The methodology is called TQM. There are classes and consultants who can help you get started with it, and after watching the video i would recommend for school districts.

  4. Tyler says:

    “I had a 1 in 900 chance of being shot every day.”

    Who are the ones creating these lies and putting such fear in our children? And for what purpose?

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