Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Jun 08 2018

FF: Falling Off

What do you think the wood strapping is for?

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14 Responses to “FF: Falling Off”

  1. Cda says:

    To hang more posters on the fire rated door??

    To hold the falling apart door together??

  2. Lach says:

    Possibly to hold the stiles in the correct spot? Looks like the hinge side at least is pulling away from the core causing the hinge failure.

  3. Michael Glenn says:

    Not sure of the original intention, but it probably did a great job of further damaging the door.

  4. Fred Warren says:

    I could be wrong, but I think that opening this door more than 90 degrees with the strapping to the door edge could do some serious damage to the hinges…

    • Adam Miceli says:

      Could be what caused the damage, maybe the strapping was on before for another purpose? Way too frequent that building owners/supers don’t understand they cannot field modify rated doors.

    • Martin (aka lauxmyth) says:

      Maybe it was only a small crack when some fool added the straps. Then some user did open to the point the strap tore the ‘wood’ such as it is further out. But for public safety, just take the door down pending repairs. It has already failed as a fire separation and security barrier.

  5. Dom LoBello says:

    Not sure about the strapping but I have seen hinge failures on fire rated plaster filled doors.
    They do not have adequate blocking to hold the hinge screws and over time or rough usage the hinges pull off the door.
    Only a full length hinge would help but only if used during the initial installation.
    Not sure what the door manufacturers recommend.

  6. Ken Brann says:

    Am a first time commenter. Using block coursing as a measurement scale, door appears to be 3-6 wide. Have been specifying continuous hinges on all mineral core rated wood doors greater than 3-0, and for all mineral core rated wood doors of 3-0 size at high use locations. Picture gives credence to doing such. Have had issues with butt hinges in mineral core rated wood doors over the years. This web site is a great resource that I refer to and quote often.

  7. Matt says:

    My basement outside door was peeling away at the bottom due to water splashing up on the big-box store exterior door, which is really a chunk of particle board sandwiched in plywood. I got a pair of 36 W by 24 H sheet metal plates and sandwiched the lower 24″ of the door in them with carriage bolts, and the door hasn’t complained since.

    Perhaps someone did this to keep the skin from peeling off the door.

  8. ken davis says:

    Probably caused by someone putting a wedge between door hinge and frame to hold door open and then someone trying to close door with wedge still in place, i see this all to often on jobs. the hinge didn’t fail the door did. not much stile on door that size

  9. Rich McKie says:

    As I commented on Lori’s previous thread on this subject, Our school district had doors of similar construction installed in the exit stairway of a new Elementary School. In our case the gypsum filled doors were 4 feet wide, and must have weighed at least 200 pounds with hardware Panic Bar and outside gripset trim, and a Grade 1 Closer). In a matter of months one of the doors failed like the one in the photo. The hinge stayed attached to the stile but the weight of the door caused it to break away from the stile until the lock edge dragged on the ground rendering it unable to close. The structure of the door failed, not the hinge mount. We had the door replaced on warranty but it failed again shortly after. At that point the door was replaced with a rated steel door and we have not had any further issues.
    One interesting note, Our failed door was on a stairwell at the far end of the school. An identical door located near the school office is still holding up well 8 years after installation. Hmmm……

  10. David Birozy says:

    I think the strapping is there so people don’t staple signs directly onto the door. Staple holes could damage the door, and change it’s aesthetics. The sign should have been affixed to the strapping with a thumbtack, not stapled to the face of the door.

    As a side note, the door is clearly marked as an exit only, there is no re-entry permitted, and people aren’t even permitted to knock on the door. So why put the “do not use” sign on the exterior? Isn’t that kind of like putting a, “Caution, large hole” sign at the bottom of the hole?

    When the door falls off and clobbers an employee, does the employer get extra points with Workers’ Comp and OSHA because they put the sign there? Does a plaintiff’s attorney say, “We’ll, there was a sign, so we can’t sue them?” Ya, I didn’t think so either.

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