Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
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Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


May 03 2017

WW: This door to remain unlocked…

Category: Egress,Panic Hardware,Wordless WednesdayLori @ 12:42 am Comments (9)
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Austin Bammann of Central Indiana Hardware sent me this Wordless Wednesday photo.  You may notice that there is signage above the door stating, “This door needs to remain unlocked during business hours.”  Does this signage make the opening code-compliant?  Why, or why not?

9 Responses to “WW: This door to remain unlocked…”

  1. Rich says:

    Wonderful install on the exit device. It is either not level, or only one end is barred down and the bar end screws are loose. Hard to tell. The slide bolt is not compliant at all on an exit door. It appears to be an exit to a patio and the exit path is blocked by tables on the outside.

  2. Eric Rieckers says:

    Is it the main entry?

  3. Mark Epling says:

    Not code-compliant. Door hardware (i.e. exit device) operation must have the capability of over-riding any lock on the door. Flush bolt at bottom is prohibited (and unwise). The exit path beyond this door must be clear of obstructions (i.e. tables and chairs).

  4. Gil Wade says:

    Hello Lori,
    No, I don’t think it is code compliant because of the barrel bolt at the bottom of the door.
    Any one can lock or unlock it.
    High Regards,
    Gil

  5. Jerry Richmond AHC/CDC says:

    The sign could read, “This is the greatest egress in the world!”, but that doesn’t make it right. To me, the sign has no bearing and is not a “get out of jail free” card. With the exit sign and rim type exit device, this is clearly indicating an exit path and the manually operated barrel bolt needs to be removed. The signage, therefore, is meaningless. Storefront doors and certain building occupancy classifications, do allow for push/pull hardware with manual deadlocks and manual flush bolts. Then, the signage makes sense and reminds employees to know the protocol. In this case, however, the bolt and sign should go! Hopefully the exit device is functioning properly and the tables, seen beyond the door, do not pose a barrier in the exit path.

  6. John Dalrymple says:

    No.

    The code is specific as to the wording and the script size. This script is smaller and wording is not per code.

  7. Pete Schifferli says:

    There are two forms of wording for the header signs:
    Uniform Building Code: THIS DOOR TO REMAIN UNLOCKED DURING BUSINESS HOURS
    NFPA and other local codes: THIS DOOR TO REMAIN UNLOCKED WHEN THE BUILDING IS OCCUPIED
    The signage is typically 24″ w x 2″ H with 1″ black letters.

  8. Joel Niemi says:

    As Mr. Dalrymple noted, the sign itself is not compliant.
    Nor is the use of the sign on a door other than the main entry; it’s pretty clear this is a second exit.
    The barrel bolt is an absolute no-no on any exit door, signs or not.
    and as several noted, need an unobstructed path outside, too.

    At least the door is not likely fire-rated, so after the barrel bolt is removed, they can fill the screw holes with brown caulk.

  9. David says:

    Once again I have see the AHJ or JHA (whatever side of the pond your on) tell owners of establishments that its ok to have slide bolts barrel bolts ancillary hardware etc as long as it remains unlocked during normal business hours or occupancy . But in the event of an emergency as comedian Russel Peters says…” somebody’s gonna get a hurting” .lol

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