Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Feb 24 2016

WW: Hangar Exit (or not)

This Wordless Wednesday photo was posted on the Truck Floor Training Facebook page, by Ian Vandenberg of Travis County Fire Rescue.  I just love the extra-large wood wedges.

Hangar Doors

15 Responses to “WW: Hangar Exit (or not)”

  1. cda says:

    Must not be an exit. The exit sign points to the left.

    And, not sure if the actual exit path is into the room shown, But still the other side could not open the doors.

    Looks like a re purposed building?? Maybe Area 51?

    • Lori says:

      If it was acceptable to remove these doors from service as an exit, the original exit sign should have been removed or covered, no? I don’t like when the exit signs with arrows are placed directly over doors because I don’t think most people would notice the arrow in a rush.

      – Lori

      • cda says:

        Yes, I would either have the exit signs removed or moved.

        Missed the mag door holders

        I still think it is Area 51!

        • Lori says:

          Your security clearance is not high enough for me to tell you the location of these doors.

          Just kidding…I don’t know where they are. 🙂

          – Lori

  2. Lee Francisco says:

    Wow! Not sure where to start. Not one of the closer arms are attached to the frame head. That gap in the left pair looks pretty large. If this is the exit shouldn’t the doors swing the other way? And speaking of exits, which sign is correct? The one in the middle or the one to the left that has an arrow pointing to the left? Not even going to talk about that bar…

    • Lori says:

      I’m guessing it was originally an exit, and then someone secured it and added the newer exit sign designating the exit to the left. Egress doors can be inswinging, if they are serving an area with an occupant load of less than 50.

      – Lori

  3. Lee Francisco says:

    Yeah I should have thought about the occupancy load. Was in quite a few hangers during my time in the Air Force. Seem to remember most of the doors swinging in the direction of egress. High hazards and all.

  4. Kevin Knippa says:

    This is in Central Texas, southeast of Austin (the Travis County Fire and Rescue service area – Travis County ESD #11). I cannot figure out what building this might be, though.

  5. Marcus Muirhead says:

    What a bad look, and especially in a Fire and Rescue facility! (Even if it’s legal, it’s a bad look.) Yikes!

  6. Leo says:

    I think we can use this for a quiz “How many things are wrong”! I got 5.
    1) The 2 Exit signs (1 with an arrow and 1 without).
    2) The closer arms are hanging.
    3) The bar through the door.
    4) The Lock Hasp on the right door.
    5) the wedge under the right door (and 1 loose next to the left door).

    Or maybe phrase it “What else can go wrong!!”

  7. John Lozano says:

    I see some closers that need to be replaced. LCN…. Half way there they are all not installed correctly.

  8. Joel Niemi says:

    Seems like they could use a few more hinges on each door leaf, too.

  9. David Bishton says:

    2 pairs of exit doors serving an occupant load of <50 – not likely. I also like how the bracket holding the bar on the left is attached to the CMU wall. The one on the right is attached to the door which may make it less secure.

    Typical scenario in an industrial facility to cheaply block access from inswing doors into an abandoned part of the building.

  10. Wolfe says:

    I can automate them!

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