Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Jul 01 2019

UHO (Unidentified Hardware Object)

Category: Historical,Locks & KeysLori @ 11:42 am Comments (13)
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‘Enquiring’ minds want to know…what was this used for?  It’s in the closet of an apartment building built in 1919, in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Thank you to Nicole Jungbauer of TCH for the photos!

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13 Responses to “UHO (Unidentified Hardware Object)”

  1. Charles a says:

    Appears part of a hinge system, since there is one on the floor. Aligned together

  2. Dave Snell, AHC says:

    If you look at the floor is looks like it was a pivot set so I would say that it is an intermediate pivot.

  3. Tim says:

    Generally was used for baby gates.

  4. Bill Cushman says:

    I would guess its a cane-bolt receiver.

  5. Greg says:

    Just a guess: The closet may have been used as an area of refuge, from a tornado. Looks like the hole in the floor aligns with the device located at strike height.

  6. Robert Chillino says:

    It’s from the surface mounted multi point latching dead bolt on their panic room or fallout shelter.
    Better than hiding under the desk.

  7. Richard Leibowitz says:

    The top piece is a part of a two piece pintle, the bottom piece receives a pin which on larger gates sits on a ball bearing to facilitate the ease of swing. A great way to hang a large gate.

  8. Fred Collier says:

    Was there a loop screwed to the door too?
    If so then a hiding place or secure area for tornado / really bad storms in MN.??

  9. Justin Robertson says:

    People are mentioning pivots, but that is clearly the strike jamb in view. Though one could make the case that this was likely retrofitted, the positioning also does not seem desirable for even an offset pivot. I would assume this is for some sort of barricade device, being on the inside of the door. It appears that this would have functioned as a safe room; from intruders, dangerous storms, or potentially to avoid an abusive situation at home (such a prevalent issue at the time it, in part, prompted the Prohibition Act in 1920).

  10. Jim Brown says:

    For starters, the strike plate indicates that this door had a deadbolt in the mortise lock. It was obviously not enough for the owner.
    It was a retrofitted with a drop bolt system of some kind that would have mounted to the door and dropped through the upper loop into the floor receptacle.

  11. Mario Toussaint says:

    In old houses, I’ve seen a lot of mortice locks with dead bolts on bedroom and bathroom doors. Even closets! Less inventory for the local hardware store. And those where activated with a bit key. The key hole went trough, thus looking trough the keyhole expression.

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