Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Oct 02 2018

Church Pair Revisited

Category: Egress,Locks & KeysLori @ 11:40 am Comments (14)
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A few months ago, I posted some photos of a pair of doors serving a church and asked for your help.  Have I told you lately how grateful I am for the feedback and expertise that many of you share so willingly?  If not, thank you!

The gist of the situation was that the existing bottom-rail deadbolts were difficult for the reverends to reach, so they were looking for something that could be mounted in a more comfortable location while maintaining code-compliance.  The locks also had to be fairly easy to install on existing doors, and had to look good.

Dan Allen of Sakahara Allen Architects sent me a photo of the solution they decided on, which incorporated Progressive Hardware R1000 revolving door locks that were extended by a custom fabricator.  What do you think?

Here’s a close-up of the locks:

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14 Responses to “Church Pair Revisited”

  1. Nicole says:

    I like this application a lot – it solves the mechanical problem and maintains the aesthetics of the opening. Gorgeous doors – I love the horizontal veneers…

  2. Gilbert Wade says:

    They look good! Nice appearance…

  3. Eric says:

    I think these walk the line of code compliance. They appear to closely meet the definition of a manual surface bolt which would not be allowed on an egress door in an assembly use.

  4. Tom Breese says:

    Beautiful opening, really like the the extended key-operated surface bolts.

    Quibbling here: this is an example of a “Norman Door” where the user is justifiably confused whether to push or pull to operate the door. This opening’s going to be rattled a lot by users pulling on the pull handles…

    • Lori says:

      I hear you, but since these are church doors maybe the parishioners know how to operate them, or they are attended by greeters, or they are held open.

      – Lori

  5. james kahm says:

    I love almost everything about this opening. the circular pulls being just a hair off is messing with my OCD though.

  6. Nolan Thrope says:

    If the bolts can be locked in the unlocked position I think it would be OK. Like a deadbolt on a store

  7. Ronald Betschman CFDI says:

    I am surprised that those locks are legal in a place of assembly. But they do look good!

  8. Dan Allen says:

    Yes, the new bolts can only be operated with a key cylinder and is on the egress/inside. This is the same operation as the original cylinder deadbolts you can still see at the bottom of the door, only at a height the reverends and staff can more easily operate. Ideally the door would have had Adams Rite 1877 with locking cylinder at standard mid height, but this wasn’t feasible/in-budget to retrofit.

    Also FYI, there are two glass storefront doors with panic hardware to the sides of this main door.

  9. Ronald Betschman CFDI says:

    “Also FYI, there are two glass storefront doors with panic hardware to the sides of this main door.”
    With that information I could live with this particular installation assuming the travel to those doors is in the 50 foot rule. Thank You.

  10. Christopher Cleaver says:

    Do we know the manufacturer of these?

  11. DAVID FEDERICO says:

    The sign on the door says it all… “DOORS TO REMAIN OPEN DURING OCCUPANCY” AHJ approval I assume
    However it should be on the door larger sign , but knowing churches they prefer things a little more discrete.
    The result, may not get what they want as now with no bottom lock to stabilize the door its possible these too will be difficult to open in time .

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