Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Jun 27 2018

WW: What’s wrong with this picture?

See anything odd in these Wordless Wednesday photos from Scott Straton of AllegionThe photos were taken in a large retail store, where the garden center on the other side of the doors was closed but the rest of the store was open.

  

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26 Responses to “WW: What’s wrong with this picture?”

  1. cda says:

    Interesting set up

    Will be neat to see all the answers

    Panichardware that does not latch

    I do not think I have seen delayed egress on an automatic door opener door??

    Signage

  2. Marius says:

    They forgot the…mullion!

  3. Leo says:

    Whats right?!

  4. cda says:

    Ok, now I am wondering, if they are doing one of my pet peeve’s???

    Closing some exits down at night, while the business is still open with customers inside!!!

    Reason for the thought, is appears the big signs, there is a hook at the top, to put them up and down with, when needed.

  5. Paul M Goldense says:

    I did not know that VD developed an invisible mullion. I cant find it in the new price book, maybe its printed in invisible ink.

  6. Charlie Hobbs says:

    Looks like the Center mullion is missing.

  7. Bryan says:

    Hmmm…
    Something is missing.
    Ha-ha.
    Let me sell you some vertical rod devices

  8. Eric Rieckers says:

    So are there shear mags holding the doors secured or is the sign just a bluff?

  9. Andrew says:

    Looks like the removable mullion is missing. Apart from that those are the biggest alarm signs I’ve ever seen! I wonder if they are UL rated 🙂

  10. KEN DRIGGERS says:

    Doors are missing the Removeable Mullion required for rim exit devices to latch to.

  11. Craig Ordmandy says:

    It looks like they removed the mullion that had the strikes attached.

  12. Raymond Holman, AHC says:

    Wow. Love the signage. Makes me wonder if they’re reversible. Sure look removable / temporary. But wait! There’s more!

    Where’s the mullion? I’d say they might have it stored in one of your wall mounting kits but the bottom bracket looks like it’s missing altogether.

    There’s no cylinder in the rail filler plate. Really doubt these are Chexit devices.

  13. Carl says:

    The panic devices are rim locking with no strikes and no way to install strikes. I wonder if they are 3 point locking when they should have been 2 point.

  14. Carl says:

    I submitted to soon. The sign implies that the devices are chex-it delayed egress, but I don’t see the reset cylinder and I don’t believe they are fire rated because I see a dogging hole.

  15. Andy Noble says:

    Two rim exit devices that latch into nothing?

  16. Carl says:

    Opp’s The mullion is missing.

  17. Joel Niemi says:

    What is the part number for the invisible removable mullion?

  18. Eric says:

    It might be easier to tell you what is “right” about the pictures.

  19. Rich McKie says:

    That actually looks familiar! In our schools it’s not uncommon for staff to remove a mullion to receive a delivery and forget to put it back.
    At the end of the day we get a panicked “Door won’t lock” phone call and have to go out and put the mullion back in place. On a couple of occasions mullions have gone missing. Yes-Mullions do get stolen! Particularly in High Schools around graduation time.
    The signs aren’t compliant but I can understand why they have them, when they are trying to change customers’ habits after a traffic pattern change. It is better than placing physical barriers in front of the exit.

  20. Khozema Kazi, AHC, FDAI says:

    Maybe Scott took this picture immediately after the store would have moved large equipment thru the opening by removing the million. Once they put back the million, the opening is good.
    The ‘entrance’ sign would then be flipped to be viewed from outside.
    If Auto operator will activate after the timed out delay, I believe is not proper.

  21. Joel Niemi says:

    Any bets that the “this entrance closed” sign was hung with the text facing the wrong way, and that the “keep pushing” sign says “this exit closed” on the other side?

    better than the flat-out “this door is locked after 8pm” signs I’ve seen on the occupied side of required exits in grocery stores

  22. John Payson says:

    Those signs are probably a stock item which are used to discourage customers from attempting to use doors in non-emergency situations (they look just like some signs I’ve seen at stores around here). If such a sign lacked the delayed-egress message, it would be necessary to ensure that it was not placed on a delayed-egress door in a way that might obscure the required placard. Including the delayed-egress text on the great big sign, however, means that it can be safely used on any door with or without a delayed egress lock (or any lock at all, for that matter).

    I don’t know if any studies have been done about how the size of “emergency exit only” signage affects the number of people setting off the alarm, but I suspect the big signs are probably more effective than smaller ones, and having one type of sign is probably easier than having different signs for different doors. It may be somewhat funny to have a delayed-egress sign on a door with no locking hardware, but the sign probably accomplishes its intended purpose.

  23. Rick halloran says:

    I like the fact that the left hand door is an entrance but the right hand door is an exit. Can you go through the wrong door if you walk backward?

  24. Charles Ford says:

    We see this as well in our schools where the center mullion has been removed to haul something in or the staff does not like the mullion in the middle of the hallway.

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