Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Jan 10 2019

Errata to ICC A117.1-2017

Category: AccessibilityLori @ 11:56 am Comments (3)
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This morning I was perusing my copy of A117.1-2017 – Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities.  To refresh your memory, this is the accessibility standard that is referenced by the International Building Code (IBC), BUT – the 2018 IBC references the 2009 edition of A117.1, so the 2017 edition of A117.1 isn’t really in use yet.  (I hope that makes sense!)  Nevertheless, when a new edition of a code or standard comes out I tend to use that one for research, so I can become familiar with changes from the previous edition.

Anyway…I was looking up something about recessed doors and the required maneuvering clearance (more on that here), and I remembered that there was an error in the section on maneuvering clearance.  The 2009 edition requires the front-approach maneuvering clearance on the push side of a manual door to extend 12 inches past the latch side if the door is equipped with both a closer and a latch.  The 2017 edition does not include the note requiring the extra 12 inches.  When I asked someone from the ICC about this a while back, I was told that it was a mistake and would be corrected by an errata document.

The errata document has been published, but it’s a little hard to find.  You can download it from the ICC’s errata page, and it does show the maneuvering clearance changed back to require the 12-inch latch side clearance when both a closer and latch are provided.  If you use this standard frequently (and you should!), the ICC has a Commentary version that includes the standard but also supplemental information explaining the intent of the requirements.  You can purchase the Commentary here.

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3 Responses to “Errata to ICC A117.1-2017”

  1. Michael Elia says:

    Here in Kalifornia, for state-regulated work [education and healthcare] it is not even worth looking at things like ANSI or even the ADA directly. We have to conform to Chapter 11B in the California Building Code, along with the other accessibility tidbits cleverly hidden in other code chapters. Our plan checkers LOVE to point those things out…

    • Lori says:

      That’s true, but for the rest of the US, the IBC references A117.1 and the ADA standards also apply to most projects, so an understanding of both is critical.

      – Lori

  2. ADAguy says:

    Thank you for this, very timely.

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