Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


School Security

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Because of all the recent news and legislative action regarding the use of barricade devices on classroom doors in schools, I have compiled many school security resources on this page.

A position paper on classroom barricade devices from the Partner Alliance for Safer Schools (PASS) is available on the Toolkits page of passK12.org:
PASS Position Statement – Classroom Barricade Devices

I wrote an article for the May issue of Doors & Hardware which contains many links to other resources.  That article is posted here:
Barricade Device? Think Twice!

There is a shorter version which may be published in newsletters or other media:
Keys to Classroom Security

An update on how the legislative process was used in an attempt to override the codes is here:
Testifying Against Barricade Devices in Schools

Here’s the latest in our series of whiteboard animation videos explaining door-related topics. This one covers various options for securing classroom doors, in alignment with the guidelines from the National Association of State Fire Marshals.

And a video of the myths and facts surrounding classroom barricade devices presented on behalf of the Door Security & Safety Foundation for the National Association of State Fire Marshals (Powerpoint slides can be downloaded here, and this information was also printed in an article in Doors & Hardware):

A white paper on the legal perspective:
School Liability and the Law of Unintended Consequences

Conceptual images of barricade devices:
What’s a barricade device, anyway?

A guest blog post from Lieutenant Joseph A. Hendry Jr. , CLEE, is posted here:
We need to do this right.

And here’s an article from Doors & Hardware also written by Lt. Hendry:
America’s Maginot Line – Why our focus on secondary locking devices makes us more vulnerable to threats

This article from Doors & Hardware magazine may help a school choose the lock function for their classroom doors:
Understanding Lock Functions

This booklet from Allegion includes helpful information about door hardware for schools:
Securing Your School

Other Resources:

State Guidelines, Laws, and Code Modifications:

  • Arkansas – law which allows barricade devices to be used
  • California – law which requires classroom doors to be lockable from within the classroom
  • Colorado – code change which allows interim measures until January 1, 2018
  • Connecticut – state fire marshal memo reinforcing current code requirements
  • Florida – DOE memo prohibiting non-code-compliant devices
  • Florida – guidelines which require classroom security locks
  • Kansas – state fire marshal memo which allows temporary security devices
  • Louisiana – state fire marshal memo which allows one additional operation to unlatch a deadbolt
  • Maryland – state fire marshal memo which requires thumbturn locking and one operation to unlock
  • Michigan – memo about latching on fire doors
  • Michigan – article stating that barricade devices are allowed
  • Minnesota – rationale against using barricade devices from the State Fire Marshal
  • Montana – state fire marshal memo reinforcing current code requirements
  • New Hampshire – school safety assessment that requires code-compliant locks
  • New Jersey – bulletin which allows some devices but not others
  • New York – bulletin which reinforces current code requirements and recommends classroom security locks
  • Ohio – bill to override current fire code requirements and allow barricade devices
  • Ohio – advisory statement supporting current code requirements
  • Ohio – Board of Building Standards Classroom Barricade Forum Report

School Security in the News:

Applications:

3 Responses to “School Security”

  1. Eric says:

    Lots of good info and resources on this page, thanks.

  2. Here’s What You Missed in 2015 | LaForce Frame of Mind says:

    […] and continue to advise customers against purchasing unsafe classroom barricade devices. See Lori Greene’s blog for more […]

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