Printed from the blog of Lori Greene, AHC/CDC, CCPR, FDAI
Allegion
Email: lori_greene@allegion.com, Blog: www.idighardware.com or www.ihatehardware.com


Apr 21 2009

Pocket Doors

Category: AccessibilityLori @ 10:42 pm Comments (0)
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pocketPersonally, I think architects like pocket doors way too much but that’s the cool thing about a blog…I get to tell everyone what I think.  😉  If you decide to use a pocket door on an opening that is required to be accessible, here’s what you need to know:

According to the accessibility standards, the hardware has to be exposed and usable from both sides when the door is fully open.  Flush pulls and edge pulls are not considered usable for someone with a disability, so surface-mounted door pulls must be used.  These surface-mounted pulls will prevent the door from sliding fully into the pocket, so the minimum clear width of 32″ must be maintained between the edge of the door in its slightly-open position, and the opposite jamb.

Here’s the text from ICC/ANSI A117.1-2003:

404.2.6  Door Hardware.  Handles, pulls, latches, locks, and other operable parts on accessible doors shall have a shape that is easy to grasp with one hand and does not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist to operate. Operable parts of such hardware shall be 34 inches* (865 mm) minimum and 48 inches (1220 mm) maximum above the floor.  Where sliding doors are in the fully open position, operating hardware shall be exposed and usable from both sides.

The 2010 ADA/ABA Accessibility Guidelines are similar:

404.2.7 Door and Gate Hardware.  Handles, pulls, latches, locks, and other operable parts on doors and gates shall comply with 309.4.  Operable parts of such hardware shall be 34 inches* (865 mm) minimum and 48 inches (1220 mm) maximum above the finish floor or ground.  Where sliding doors are in the fully open position, operating hardware shall be exposed and usable from both sides.

*Note:  Massachusetts 521 CMR requires that the operating hardware be installed between 36″ and 48″ above the floor.

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